VOTE Now to Help Kickstart Our Travelers Against Plastic (TAP) Campaign

TAP Travelers Against Plastic

We are thrilled to give you a sneak peek at an important educational campaign we are currently working on, which will launch in 2013. The Travelers Against Plastic Campaign (TAP), will educate travelers and tour operators about the devastating effects of using disposable plastic water bottles when you travel, and will encourage them to take the safe and easy step of treating their own drinking water when they travel. This is at the cornerstone of Crooked Trails’ responsible travel guidelines, and something we’ve done with our own trip participants for years. Now, we want to take it to prime time!

We are currently working with potential sponsor companies and participating tour operators and are excited to see the campaign taking shape and gaining momentum. But there is something you can do right now to help get TAP off the ground!

Voting is now open in the Travel2change Contest, hosted by Good Maker. vote-buttonPlease vote for the TAP campaign by clicking here as a way to use travel to create meaningful change for local communities. If we win, it will help fund the campaign and get it off and running! Voting only is open from November 1 – 15, so please – take just a moment and cast your vote to end the plastic trail.

When Americans travel abroad, the vast majority of them buy bottled water. According to data released by the U.S. Office of Travel & Tourism Industries, 8.1 million U.S. citizens traveled abroad in the first two months of 2012. Calculated across the calendar year, this means approximately 48.6 million Americans traveling internationally each year. Estimating that each traveler takes a 2 week trip, and consumes an average of 3 bottles of water a day, we are looking at 3.5 billion plastic water bottles used and discarded worldwide by Travel2Change Contesttravelers annually.

No traveler wants to leave a trail of plastic water bottles behind them, but many don’t know how to avoid it. The solution is easy: carry a reusable water bottle and a water treatment method such as SteriPEN, which uses (UV) light technology to purify water, destroying more than 99.9 percent of bacteria, viruses and protozoan cysts such as giardia and cryptosporidia. One SteriPEN cleans 8,000 bottles of water and one Klean Kanteen reusable bottle can last a lifetime. The savings alone are outstanding; the benefit to the environment is priceless.

If you’d like to take part as a sponsoring company or participating tour operator, please contact chris@crookedtrails.org. Watch for a full campaign launch announcement in 2013!


 

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2 Comments on “VOTE Now to Help Kickstart Our Travelers Against Plastic (TAP) Campaign”

  1. done!

    I couldn’t believe how much plastic trash i saw on the Everest Base Camp trek I took recently. It could have been much worse, but still – in an area that pristine, even seeing any mineral water trash was unsettling. I saw a few places down toward Lukla that advertised UV filtering – but I had my steri-pen. Up higher where there was no tap water to sterilize (though I could have used river water I chose not to for ease) I switched to boiling water. I brought extra nalgene bottles with the assumption my fellow trekkers might not get how it works and be prepared and I was right – all bottles were used. You can buy them on the trail, but that was one way I helped my group (in addition to sterilizing water for them with my steripen!) Going with a trekking company that does not support the use of plastic mineral water bottles, like Grand Asian Journeys/Crystal Mountain treks who I went with, is another important step.

  2. done!

    I couldn’t believe how much plastic trash i saw on the Everest Base Camp trek I took recently. It could have been much worse, but still – in an area that pristine, even seeing any mineral water trash was unsettling. I saw a few places down toward Lukla that advertised UV filtering – but I had my steri-pen. Up higher where there was no tap water to sterilize (though I could have used river water I chose not to for ease) I switched to boiling water. I brought extra nalgene bottles with the assumption my fellow trekkers might not get how it works and be prepared and I was right – all bottles were used. You can buy them on the trail, but that was one way I helped my group (in addition to sterilizing water for them with my steripen!) Going with a trekking company that does not support the use of plastic mineral water bottles, like Grand Asian Journeys/Crystal Mountain treks who I went with, is another important step.

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